The Day Is Waiting

Farming:
In some places the corn and wheat are the same height. I doubt that happens often, and it won’t stay that way long. Heat makes corn grow like a weed, and the wheat’s days are numbered. It still has some green in it, but we’re getting to time of beautiful contrast between the bright green corn and bright gold wheat.

Small Town Nebraska:
The kids have all discovered mulberries and where the mulberry trees are located around town this week. If we could live off of mulberries, peas and lettuce, I wouldn’t have to grocery shop.

Recommendations:
My mom directed me toward Kendra’s blog. Her post on what to say to someone going through a hard time is very good. The Day Is Waiting You know Corduroy, the little bear with the overall button that falls off? Well, they took some of the unpublished art work from his creator, Don Freeman, and put it in a book with a poem by Linda Zuckerman. Maybe you’ve seen this book before because it was actually originally published in 1980. The book is titled The Day Is Waiting, and is a cute, quick rhyming read for kids. The lines on each page are short enough that I could actually be ready to turn the page before my one year old. The poem starts by asking “What do you see when you look outside?” and then gives some realistic and silly ideas of things they might see. Other questions follow to get little brains creatively thinking. I’m not artist, but it looks to me like a variety of artistic mediums are included and a wide variety of objects, like penguins, police, and ponds. It could make a great board book, although it would be a rather thick one. Thank you to BookLook Bloggers for providing me with a free copy of this book to review.

Life

Small Town Nebraska:
Liza gets very excited when we get to see cows when we’re out on a walk. Recently we saw one selfish cow taking a dip in the drinking water.

Cow in the Water tank


We went to a neighborhood (think 20 mile radius) BBQ in this barn last weekend.

Nebraska BarnI had heard before that this used to be Brad’s great grandpa’s place. It didn’t sink into my brain until I heard Brad’s dad tell me stories about the barn while I was standing in it and saw where Brad’s great grandpa had carved his initials in the barn.IMG_2240-0

The current owners have redone the barn, and it made for a fabulous “neighborhood” gathering.

IMG_2232-0 IMG_2234-0Check out what they did with the original trough.

The original trough were the horses used to eat before they went to work in the field

The original trough were the horses used to eat before they went to work in the field

Farming:
I’ve decided Brad must really like spraying, since he can get up at 4 a.m. consecutive days to go do it. I might set my alarm for 6 and roll out of bed at 6:30. He says it helps that it’s just for a season. Maybe my rolling out of bed is because it seems like it’s a really long season at the moment… or maybe not (see below).

What I’ve Been Thinking:
Juliet ended up back in the hospital this week, and another friend will be sitting at a funeral for her husband next week. (Hence the short post last Saturday, no human words are needed on a day like that.) I trust that God is working in both of their situations, and that He is going to take care of them. Then it comes to my own world, and I struggle to trust Him with all the little daily things that go along with being a mom to three children. Maybe that’s why I just roll out of bed after hitting the snooze three times, or maybe if I just got up at 4 I’d have time to get something done and not feel stressed about it all day. I don’t see that happening, so I’m going to have to keep working on trusting and resting in Him.

If you’d like to pray for my friends, we’re praying that Juliet’s hospital stay would be 10 days or less instead of 100+ like her last one, and we’re praying for moments of real happiness each day for my friend whose husband is now singing and laughing in heaven. Thank you.

Recommendations:
Juliet’s mom shared with song with me.

Cookies!

Farming:
Brad can finally check planting off his spring list of jobs, just 30 days later than he wanted!  Less than thirty minutes after he texted me that, it started raining…again. Now he just hopes he can get in a 16 hour day of spraying.

My Family:
Summer life is in full swing. About half of our June evenings will be enjoyed watching some adorable T-ball players. They have big plans to “hit it out of the park” this year.

They also decided to start selling stamps, and I don’t even have to give them real or pretend money when I buy them. They add up how much I owe them, I tell them how much money I’m giving them, and they tell me what I get for change. A summer math review, and it was all their idea! Here’s to hoping they have good ideas and read their “haet” out all summer.

IMG_9106

Recommendations:

cookie loveI received a free copy of Cookie Love by Mindy Segal thanks to Blogging for Books. Cookie Love does have a recipe for Classic Chocolate Chip Cookies, but it’s not your typical cookie cookbook. This would be the cookbook for you if you want to venture out into baking cookies beyond your typical drop cookies and brownies. It has chapters on Shortbreads, Egg White Cookies, and Rugelach + Kolachkes, plus chapters on things you would expect in a cookie cookbook. You get artistic pictures of most of the recipes, and they all look delicious. A few recipes have ingredients that I would have to do some major hunting to find out here in western Nebraska, but you can guess which ones by the name of the cookie usually (e.g., Goat Butter Shortbread, Folgers Crystals with Sour Cream Gianduja). Most of the recipes have ingredients you probably have in your kitchen as long as you’re okay with substituting the salt you have in your kitchen for sea salt flakes. The directions for how to make the treats are very thorough and descriptive. I actually see myself making some of these sweet treats, hopefully the Chocolate Toffee Biscotti before the weekend is over.

Speaking of cookies, take a look at this food art. I will never be able to make food look so good; but I like seeing how other people do it, especially if they’re in Nebraska.

Diesel

Farming:
This is my happy farmer. As I was leaving here, I stopped to catch a picture. Brad thought I wanted to tell him something so he started running towards the pick up, but then he realized I was taking a picture and tried to run out of it. He didn’t make it.
happy farmerSee all those clouds? We think we’re experiencing what it might be like to live in Seattle. Brad didn’t fuel the sprayer up all the way today because he believed the forecast when it said it would be raining by 10am. He called me at 9 to see if I could bring him some fuel so he could keep spraying instead of having to drive for 40 miles to the gas station.

Let me tell you I wasn’t too eager to say yes. Whatever this involved didn’t really go with my schedule, but I grumpily obliged. I dislike the reminder that his time is more valuable than mine and that I’m not as happy of a helper as I should be. Many a wife of a farmer is often blessed with this humbling reminder.

If I would’ve had to hook to fuel trailer I wouldn’t have even tried to say I would help, but filling red jugs with diesel was what I had to do. He had three empty, but he thought one more would be best. That one more was full of regular gas that I got to pour into one of his pick ups. Wyatt tried to capture this – a photographer in the making.

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I then went to fill these four jugs with diesel at the gas station. I got two done, couldn’t get the lid off of the third, so I moved onto the fourth. Then I see liquid starting to drip off the tailgate!!! What am I supposed to do with that?! Brad had specifically said to make sure to not get diesel on me since it’s the stinky stuff. We’re on a first name basis with the employees here so I ran into the tire shop and pleaded for help. The man I later paid with some frosted cinnamon rolls got the lid off the third jug and poured what was in the leaking fourth into the third. He got diesel all over himself and cleaned up my mess. I remained unsmelly.

Liza was unimpressed with being stuck in her carseat.

IMG_9096I was so flustered and in a hurry that I didn’t even think to finish filling the third jug the rest of the way. All that effort to get four jugs of fuel, and he only got 2 1/2.

Diesel Leak

It was enough because it was a downpour where he was at by 2:30.

He had to have his skinny tires put back on the sprayer today. He’s in mourning over it.

On Shifting Sand

Farming:
Sinking sand is what gravel roads are like around here. I’m so glad we live on asphalt. We see rain in the forecast and actually plan it will come, unlike before when we figured the chance of rain would disappear before the day arrived. With all the rain, little has been planted this week. We’ve heard some talk of the wheat possibly scabbing or rusting or something; but we’ll still take the rain. Speaking of wheat, I need to get you pictures of the winter kill. It’s all over the place. It’s on my mental to-do list.

Recommendations:on shifting sand

On Shifting Sand by Allison Pittman was sent to me by Tyndale House Publishers so I could review it for you. I wouldn’t recommend reading it if you’re looking for a light read.

It’s written in first person present, with the first person being a young wife and mother living in Oklahoma during the dust bowl. It takes on an erie feel to start and rarely feels light hearted. You read so much about all the dirt and dust it almost makes you feel dirty. I have a whole new appreciation for anyone who lived through that depressing time.

All that dust and dryness Pittman uses as a metaphor to sin, and the impact of sin on the main character’s life is devastating just like the drought. You can’t read this book and miss that point. Realizing that metaphor made me appreciate this book, and I then ended up wanting to read it. Before that I was just depressed by the lack of rain, the impossible task they had of keeping things clean, and the main character’s poor choices. Overall, I’d say this is an impressively written book.

What I’m Thinking and Learning: 
The above book and a variety of other things have me thinking of this verse.

Deuteronomy 30:19 I  call heaven and earth to witness against you today, that I have set before you life and death, the blessing and the curse. So choose life [following God’s way] in order that you may live, you and your descendants,

Asparagus 

Update: 
Juliet turned 1 this week. I stole her mom’s picture off Facebook, so you could see her sweet face and family.

juliet1Small Town Nebraska:
The kids and I were just finishing up a little community service project, (little being the key word), when a country neighbor pulls up to give us some asparagus and eggs (and some seed corn Brad might need if he ever gets to plant again).farm eggs and asparagus

I think God was reminding me I can’t out give Him. Then He made sure I got the point when we were given more asparagus later that day. We really like asparagus.

We don’t so much like this,
snake in the housebut I’m super excited about this row of sunflowers popping up!
sunflower sprouts

Farming:
If only I could count how many times we check the weather in a day. Brad needs little wind to spray and the field to dry out so he can plant. We’ve had very little of either. We’ve actually had Brad here to eat supper with us, but it feels slightly unsettling because we wonder when it will ever work to get that corn planted. At the same time, we work very hard to not complain about the rain. It’s just so strange to have had it appear repeatedly for more than two days.

Today he was finally able to get a full day of spraying. We saw him for 2 minutes when he rushed into the house at supper time, (Guess what we were having for a vegetable.) washed his hands, grabbed some Snickers, and said he was going to the big town to get some parts. If you’re going to have a break down, the end of the day is the time to do it I guess.

Recommendations:
May I recommend Focus on the Family’s Family Project to you?
Family ProjectTheir website says it best, “The Family Project is a 12 session DVD experience for couples or small groups that explores the theological, philosophical, and cultural underpinnings of the traditional family, and combines that information with inspiring stories and practical tools to help 21st-century families thrive.”

We went through it with several couples and enjoyed it and learned from it at the same time. If you’re interested, I know where you could borrow the DVD’s.